UK Aeronautical Information Services

NATS Swanwick, Room 3115

Sopwith Way,

Southampton, SO31 7AY

aissupervisor@nats.co.uk

http://www.ais.org.uk

01489 887462

01912 032329 (Distribution)

AFS: EGGNYNYX

AIC for United Kingdom

Aeronautical Information Service

AIC

P 056/2020

Effective 30 JUL 2020

  DUTY TO REPORT AIRCRAFT ACCIDENTS AND SERIOUS INCIDENTS

1 — Introduction

1.1 Regulation (EU) No. 996/2010 of the European Parliament and of the Council on the investigation and prevention of accidents and incidents in civil aviation and the United Kingdom Civil Aviation (Investigation of Accidents and Incidents) Regulations 2018 require that a reportable accident or serious incident, occurring in or over the United Kingdom or elsewhere to an aircraft registered in the United Kingdom, should be notified as soon as possible to:
  1. the Chief Inspector, Air Accidents Investigation Branch (AAIB), Department for Transport (Dft):

    AAIB 24-Hour Reporting line

    01252-512299

  2. a police officer for the area where the accident occurs giving details of its location.

Note: The Civil Aviation Authority should also be notified of any event, not being an accident or serious incident, by which the safety of an aircraft or any persons is threatened within 72 hours of being made; or becoming aware of it (See European Regulation EU376/2014 for further details and CAP 382: for Information and Guidance).

1.2 Any person involved who has knowledge of an accident or serious incident must notify the AAIB. This will usually be the commander of the aircraft involved at the time of the accident, or if they are killed or incapacitated then the operator or owner (as applicable) of the aircraft. In addition, where the accident occurs on or adjacent to an aerodrome the aerodrome authority must also give such notice.
1.3 ‘Accident’ means an occurrence associated with the operation of an aircraft which in the case of a manned aircraft takes place between the time any person boards the aircraft with the intention of flight and until such time all persons have disembarked, or in the case of an unmanned aircraft takes place between the time the aircraft is ready to move with the purpose of flight until such time it comes to rest at the end of the flight and the primary propulsion system is shut down in which:
  1. a person is fatally or seriously injured as a result of:

    1. being onboard the aircraft; or

    2. direct contact with any part of the aircraft, including parts which have become detached from the aircraft; or

    3. direct exposure to jet blast

      except when the injuries are from natural causes, self-inflicted or inflicted by other persons or when injuries are to stowaways hiding outside the areas normally available in flight to the passengers and crew; or

  2. the aircraft sustains damage or structural failure which adversely affects the structural strength, performance or flight characteristics of the aircraft, and would normally require major repair or replacement of the affected component, except for:

    1. engine failure or damage, when the damage is limited to a single engine (including its cowlings or accessories); or

    2. damage to propellers, wing tips, antennas, probes, vanes, tyres, brakes, wheels, fairings, panels, landing gear doors, windscreens, the aircraft skin (such as small dents or puncture holes); or

    3. minor damage to main rotor blades, tail rotor blades, landing gear; or

    4. damage from hail or bird strike (including holes in the radome); or

  3. the aircraft is missing or is completely inaccessible.

1.4 ‘serious incident’ means an incident involving circumstances indicating that there was a high probability of an accident and is associated with the operation of an aircraft, which in the case of a manned aircraft, takes place between the time any person boards the aircraft with the intention of flight until such time as all such persons have disembarked, or in the case of an unmanned aircraft, takes place between the time the aircraft is ready to move with the purpose of flight until such time it comes to rest at the end of the flight and the primary propulsion system is shut down.

2 — Notification

2.1 Notification to the AAIB will need to include:
  1. aircraft type, model, nationality and registration;

  2. name of the owner, the operator and the hirer, if any;

  3. name of the commander;

  4. date and time (UTC) of the accident or serious incident;

  5. last point of departure and next point of intended landing;

  6. location of the accident or serious incident;

  7. numbers of crew and passengers on board at the time of the accident or serious incident, the number of crew and passengers killed or seriously injured as a result of the accident and the number of other persons killed or seriously injured elsewhere than on the aircraft.

  8. the nature of the accident or serious incident and brief particulars of the damage to the aircraft, and

  9. any dangerous goods.

    Note: As much of this information as is immediately available should be sent to the AAIB by the quickest means available.

2.2  The reporter is also required to notify the UK CAA of any aircraft accident or serious incident within 72 hours of becoming aware of it. This can be achieved using the organisations internal reporting process (if one exists) or through the aviation reporting portal. Further details of how and what to report are laid in in Regulation (EU) No.376/2014 and implementation Regulation (EU) No. 2015/1018.

3 — Preservation of Evidence

3.1 No person shall modify the state of the site of the accident, take any samples therefrom, undertake any movement of or sampling from the aircraft, its contents or its wreckage, move or remove it, except where such action may be required for safety reasons or to bring assistance to injured persons, or under the express permission of the authorities in control of the site and, when possible, in consultation with the AAIB.
3.2 Any person involved shall take all necessary steps to preserve documents, material and recordings in relation to the event, in particular so as to prevent erasure of recordings of conversations and alarms after the flight.
3.3 An Inspector of Air Accidents has the power to call and examine witnesses and to require them to furnish or produce information or evidence relevant to the safety investigation.

4 — Further Information

4.1 Any of the above information that is not immediately available should be sent as soon as is practicable to:

Air Accidents Investigation BranchDepartment for TransportBerkshire Copse RoadAldershotHantsGU11 2HH

Email: enquiries@aaib.gov.uk